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Caktus Consulting Group
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Bootcamp Software Setup

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Instructions on how to setup your computer for the bootcamp.

Bootcamp Requirements

Intro

Here are the required and recommended software installations. It is important that you come to class prepared--if you have problems getting the required packages installed, please ask on the mailing list before class, so we can get you up to speed.

Knowledge of your computer

Please know how to do basic things (connect to a network, unzip files, get to a Python interpreter prompt, disable firewall software, open PDFs, etc.) on the computer you bring to class. Or sit next to someone who seems to be using your operating system. :)

Windows

Plone (Required)

For Windows, the best thing is to install Plone from the installer. You can find the most recent version (2.1.2) at:

http://prdownloads.sourceforge.net/plone/Plone-2.1.2.exe?download

Any version of Plone since 2.1.0 is fine for class; anything earlier than that, and you won't be able to follow along with all the exercises.

When installing Plone, it will prompt you for a username and password for the administrative user--please use "admin" for both username and password.

Archiving Program: WinZip (Required for older versions of Windows)

Recent versions of Windows can open .zip files directly, but, older versions will require a program like WinZip:

http://www.winzip.com

We'll need this to open up Plone add-on products, which are often packaged as archives.

UML Editor: ArgoUML (Useful)

A program for editing "UML diagrams", which are a way of drawing data schemas. We'll use this in class to design an Archetype (a custom type of content).

There are lots of UML editors, and almost all of them will work fine. If you already have and know how to use a UML editor, you can use that.

Otherwise, you can install ArgoUML, which is free, and, being written in Java, should run easily on Windows.

http://argouml.tigris.org/

If you can't install this, or don't want to, you'll be able to follow along by watching without missing too much.

GraphViz (Not important)

I'll be demonstrating an add-on product for Plone (DCWorkflowGraph) which can show a real-time graphic of a workflow diagram; this requires GraphViz, an open source diagramming library. You can downloda this at:

http://www.graphviz.org/pub/graphviz/ARCHIVE/graphviz-2.8.exe

This is not required; however, you will probably find this a useful feature in real-world use, and I'll be doing a quick demo in class, so if you can get this installed, great.

Mac OSX

Plone (Required)

For OSX, the best thing is to install Plone from the installer. You can find the most recent version (2.1.2) at:

http://prdownloads.sourceforge.net/plone/Plone2.1.2-MacOSX.pkg.zip?download

Any version of Plone since 2.1.0 is fine for class; anything earlier than that, and you won't be able to follow along with all the exercises.

Wing IDE (Highly recommended)

Wing IDE is a editor and debugger for Python; we'll use it for both editing on-disk code, and to learn how to debug Plone. Even if you have an editor you prefer to use, we'll specifically focus on debugging Plone with Wing, so you'll want it.

http://wingware.com/downloads

It is a commercial product, but it has an evaluation license that will allow you to use the product for a few days, and that's fine for class.

I think it's a very worthwhile purchase, though; usually about 3/4 of my students report that they bought a full license (about $50) after class, once they've seen what it can do.

Unfortunately, Wing requires that you have a X windows server, which isn't normally part of a standard OSX install; there are instructions on OSX installations of Wing at:

http://wingware.com/doc/howtos/osx

If you can't get Wing installed, you can use any editor to edit the code, and you can watch along during the demonstration of debugging.

Firefox (Highly recommended)

Even if you use Safari for your daily browsing, it's very useful to have a second browser for Plone--that way, one browser can be used for the Manager-logged-in-user, and one for testing as an ordinary person. In addition, Firefox has a very useful extension (below) we'll also be using.

http://www.mozilla.com/firefox/

Firefox's Web Developer Extensions (Highly recommended)

A fantastically useful add on for Firefox; we'll be using this to learn to how to stylize Plone, bugfix CSS errors, etc. It's a very easy install once Firefox is set up:

http://chrispederick.com/work/webdeveloper/

UML Editor: ArgoUML (Useful)

A program for editing "UML diagrams", which are a way of drawing data schemas. We'll use this in class to design an Archetype (a custom type of content).

There are lots of UML editors, and almost all of them will work fine. If you already have and know how to use a UML editor, you can use that.

Otherwise, you can install ArgoUML, which is free, and, being written in Java, should run easily on OSX.

http://argouml.tigris.org/

If you can't install this, or don't want to, you'll be able to follow along by watching without missing too much.

GraphViz (Not Important)

I'll be demonstrating an add-on product for Plone (DCWorkflowGraph) which can show a real-time graphic of a workflow diagram; this requires GraphViz, an open source diagramming library. You can downloda this at:

http://www.graphviz.org/pub/graphviz/ARCHIVE/graphviz-2.8.tar.gz

I've never installed this on OSX; it's possible that it's not an easy install. It's also possible that this may be in Fink or whatever is the currently-hip OSX software installation world.

This is not required; however, you will probably find this a useful feature in real-world use, and I'll be doing a quick demo in class, so if you can get this installed, great.

Linux

If you're coming using Linux, I'm going to assume you're a fairly technical user; therefore, my instructions here assume you're familiar with building and installing software under Linux.

Python (Required)

Almost all Linux distributions already ship with Python. If not, check for a compiled-for-your-distribution version.

Only Python 2.3.x is technically supported for the versions of Zope we'll be using, but I use Python 2.4, since that's what my Linux distribution installs, and everything works fine. Note that to install Zope on Python 2.4, you'll need to pass the Zope configuration command a "--with-python=/path/to/python/executable" option so that it knows that you want ot use that version of Python; otherwise, it will complain that it can't find Python 2.3.x.

Zope (Required)

I highly recommend you install from the Zope and Plone sources. Zope and Plone are an easy install from source. Almost all of the RPM/deb/Gentoo packaging efforts for Zope and Plone tend to be nonstandard and not updated. Furthermore, no serious developer I know uses them, and, so, if you use them, you tend to put yourself out on an island with regard to support.

Please download Zope 2.8.6 (or anything on the Zope 2.8.x line). Please do not install Zope 2.9.x, as these have no been tested with Plone yet, and won't be supported in class. Do not install Zope 3; this is an entirely unrelated product to the Zope we'll be using.

You can install this anywhere; in class, I'll usually assume your Zope software is installed somewhere like /usr/local/zope.

Once you've installed Zope, you can build your "INSTANCE_HOME" by executing

/usr/local/zope/bin/mkzopeinstance.py

Give it the username/password of "admin"/"admin" and the directory of /var/zope (if you choose a different directory, please remember that; you'll need to know where your instance home is to install Plone!)

Plone (Required)

Please install from source (as described above).

In class, we'll be using Plone 2.1.2, the most recently released Plone. You can also use 2.1.0 or 2.1.1 without any problems. If you're using 2.0.x or earlier, you won't be able to follow along with a few examples, though most of the class will still make sense.

Please do not use a unreleased developer copy of Plone (ie, from our subversion repository).

The Plone source package is just a bunch of Zope products. These should be installed in your "INSTANCE_HOME", the location of your Zope server. Within your instance home (normally, /var/zope), place the contents of the Plone tarball in Products. So, you should have, in /var/zope/Products, a bunch of folders (CMFCore, CMFDefault, CMFPlone, etc.)

Please test that you know how to start up and stop your Zope instance; if you can, check that you can add a Plone site.

Wing IDE (Highly recommended)

Wing IDE is a editor and debugger for Python; we'll use it for both editing on-disk code, and to learn how to debug Plone. Even if you have an editor you prefer to use, we'll specifically focus on debugging Plone with Wing, so you'll want it.

http://wingware.com/downloads

It is a commercial product, but it has an evaluation license that will allow you to use the product for a few days, and that's fine for class.

I think it's a very worthwhile purchase, though; usually about 3/4 of my students report that they bought a full license (about $50) after class, once they've seen what it can do.

Wing is available either as an RPM or as a Linux installer; either is fine.

If you don't install Wing, you'll need a text editor that you know how to use.

Firefox (Highly recommended)

Chances are, you already have Firefox, but if your Linux distro uses a different browser, please install it. It's very useful to have a second browser for Plone--that way, one browser can be used for the Manager-logged-in-user, and one for testing as an ordinary person. In addition, Firefox has a very useful extension (below) we'll also be using.

http://www.mozilla.com/firefox/

Firefox's Web Developer Extensions (Highly recommended)

A fantastically useful add on for Firefox; we'll be using this to learn to how to stylize Plone, bugfix CSS errors, etc. It's a very easy install once Firefox is set up:

http://chrispederick.com/work/webdeveloper/

UML Editor: ArgoUML (Useful)

A program for editing "UML diagrams", which are a way of drawing data schemas. We'll use this in class to design an Archetype (a custom type of content).

There are lots of UML editors, and almost all of them will work fine. If you already have and know how to use a UML editor, you can use that.

Otherwise, you can install ArgoUML, which is free, and, being written in Java, should run easily on Linux, assuming you have Java installed.

http://argouml.tigris.org/

The normal command to run ArgoUML once unpacked will be something like:

$ java -jar argouml/argouml.jar

If you can't install this, or don't want to, you'll be able to follow along by watching without missing too much.

GraphViz (Not important)

I'll be demonstrating an add-on product for Plone (DCWorkflowGraph) which can show a real-time graphic of a workflow diagram; this requires GraphViz, an open source diagramming library. You can downloda this at:

http://www.graphviz.org/pub/graphviz/ARCHIVE/graphviz-2.8.tar.gz

It's likely your distro already has graphviz packed up, though; and it's perfectly fine to use a package for this.

This is not required; however, you will probably find this a useful feature in real-world use, and I'll be doing a quick demo in class, so if you can get this installed, great.

Python Imaging Library (Not important)

A library for Python that Plone uses to resize images. Things will work without this, but your images won't resize. This is installed in many Linux distributions by default, and your distro probably has a package for it. To test if you have it, go into a Python interpreter shell and try to "import Image".

TriPython endorses:

PyLadies RDU

September 14-16, 2016:

PyData Carolinas 2016

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